Maydenhayes Inspiration – The Beckett House

Samuel Beckett – The Beckett House

Samuel Beckett Three Bed Beckett House
Our delightful Three Bed Beckett House draws its inspiration from the leading Irish writer Samuel Beckett. He was born in Foxrock, Dublin on Good Friday 13th April 1906 and died in Paris on 22nd December 1989. He is widely acknowledged as one of the last “Modernist” Writers. Samuel Beckett was the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969.

Novelist, Theatre Director, Poet and Playwright, Beckett’s work has been described as “Black Comedy” or “Gallows humour”. He was educated in Portora Royal School, Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh and later Trinity College where he studied French, Italian and English. His childhood was spent in Dublin, but he lived most of his adult life in Paris and he wrote many later pieces in fluid French.

View our 3 Bedroom Beckett House house

Interesting Facts About Samuel Beckett:

  • He was stabbed in the chest in 1938 in Paris and almost died, but his long-time friend and fellow writer James Joyce intervened and secured him a private hospital room to expedite his recovery. He then dropped the charges against his attacker because he found him “mannerly and likeable”.
  • It’s rumoured that he had a falling out in later life with James Joyce after spurning the romantic advances of Joyce’s daughter, Lucia.   Read about James Joyce Here 
  • As a resident in France, Beckett joined the French Revolution in 1940. After escaping the Gestapo, he fled South to Roussillon in 1942 and continued his campaign of sabotage by storing armaments in his back yard. He was eventually awarded Croix de Guerre and the Medaille de la Resistance by the French Government for his efforts in thwarting the German Occupation.
  • He learned he had won the 1969 Nobel Prize for Literature while on holiday in Tunisia. Notoriously publicity-shy, he refused to accept his Nobel Prize in person so he wouldn’t have to give a speech. Beckett’s publisher accepted his award on his behalf.
  • His famous quote from his 1983 novella Worstward Ho “Ever tried. Ever Failed. No matter. Try again. Fail better” has been such a source of inspiration world wide that entrepreneurs such as Richard Branson and Tim Ferriss have been known to reference the Beckett “Fail Better” quote for motivation.

Novelist, Theatre Director, Poet and Playwright, Beckett’s work has been described as “Black Comedy” or “Gallows humour”. He was educated in Portora Royal School, Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh and later Trinity College where he studied French, Italian and English. His childhood was spent in Dublin, but he lived most of his adult life in Paris and he wrote many later pieces in fluid French.

Some of his notable works include:


Murphy
 (1938)
Molloy (1951)
Malone Dies (1951)
The Unnamable (1953)
Waiting for Godot (1953)
Watt (1953)
Endgame (1957)
Krapp’s Last Tape (1958)
How It Is (1961)